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New Bird Blind Available at Inks Lake State Park PDF Print E-mail
Written by Texas Outdoors   
Sunday, 05 October 2014 14:32

New Bird Blind Available at Inks Lake State Park

BURNET – Thanks to a newly constructed bird blind at Inks Lake State Park, visitors now have the chance to quietly observe birds flitting from tree to tree, perch on a feeder or sing to other birds.

The bird blind’s grand opening on the north side of the park will be at 10 a.m. Oct. 7. Friends of Inks Lake will provide refreshments at the event, which is free and open to the public.

Conceived in March 2013 by the Texas Master Naturalist Highland Lakes Chapter, the blind opened to the public on Sept. 1. The structure will allow park visitors to enjoy birding, as well as provide a space for educational programs. The blind can seat some 40 adults or 50 children with additional standing room. Plexiglas windows, a solar-powered water feature, photography portals and a rainwater collection system are some of the defining features of the wooden blind.

Admission to the bird blind is included with daily park entrance fees.

In addition to local Texas Master Naturalist chapter members, who donated their time and materials, the bird blind was also facilitated by the Texas Department of Transportation. That agency provided the access road and parking area, and Triple C Feed Store in Burnet made a significant donation.

To reach the bird blind, turn left on Park Road 4 from Inks Lake State Park Headquarters and travel 2.2 miles. The gate will be on the left side of the road. From Texas Highway 29, turn onto Park Road 4 and travel one mile. The gate will be on the right side of the road.

For more information about Inks Lake State Park, call (512) 793-2223 or visit http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/state-parks/inks-lake.

 
New Bird Blind Available at Inks Lake State Park PDF Print E-mail
Written by Texas Outdoors   
Sunday, 05 October 2014 14:32

New Bird Blind Available at Inks Lake State Park

BURNET – Thanks to a newly constructed bird blind at Inks Lake State Park, visitors now have the chance to quietly observe birds flitting from tree to tree, perch on a feeder or sing to other birds.

The bird blind’s grand opening on the north side of the park will be at 10 a.m. Oct. 7. Friends of Inks Lake will provide refreshments at the event, which is free and open to the public.

Conceived in March 2013 by the Texas Master Naturalist Highland Lakes Chapter, the blind opened to the public on Sept. 1. The structure will allow park visitors to enjoy birding, as well as provide a space for educational programs. The blind can seat some 40 adults or 50 children with additional standing room. Plexiglas windows, a solar-powered water feature, photography portals and a rainwater collection system are some of the defining features of the wooden blind.

Admission to the bird blind is included with daily park entrance fees.

In addition to local Texas Master Naturalist chapter members, who donated their time and materials, the bird blind was also facilitated by the Texas Department of Transportation. That agency provided the access road and parking area, and Triple C Feed Store in Burnet made a significant donation.

To reach the bird blind, turn left on Park Road 4 from Inks Lake State Park Headquarters and travel 2.2 miles. The gate will be on the left side of the road. From Texas Highway 29, turn onto Park Road 4 and travel one mile. The gate will be on the right side of the road.

For more information about Inks Lake State Park, call (512) 793-2223 or visit http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/state-parks/inks-lake.

 
Austin Area Activities PDF Print E-mail
Written by Texas Outdoors   
Sunday, 05 October 2014 14:26

Austin Area Activities

  • Explore a cave at Longhorn Cavern State Park, one of six Civilian Conservation Corps-built parks in the region. Over two-and-a-half tons of silt, dirt, and guano were hauled out, much of it by wheelbarrow, to create the park!
  • Experience farm life as park interpreters dressed as a German-immigrant family in the Hill Country in 1915, feed the livestock, make soap, gather eggs, split wood and more. On Sauer-Beckmann Farm at Lyndon B. Johnson State Park & Historic Site.
  • Stroll along a historic nature trail to visit an 1870s German family's house and brewing business at Monument Hill and Kreische Brewery State Historic Sites.
  • Experience ranch life on Ranch Heritage Day at Hill Country State Natural Area on October 18 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy free family fun with demonstrations and hands-on activities including chuck wagon tasting, branding iron demo, covered wagon rides, antique tractors and more! Dress western!

 
Fall is a Fun Time to Geocache PDF Print E-mail
Written by Texas Outdoors   
Sunday, 05 October 2014 14:23

Fall is a Fun Time to Geocache

 

kids looking in geocache container in woodsLike the outdoors in fall? Like mysteries? Try a digital outdoor treasure hunt - geocaching. It’s a great reason to roam as cooler weather and rustling leaves tempt us to spend time in Texas State Parks.

Never tried it? Here’s a how-to video to help you get started.

You’ll need a GPS unit or smartphone app to find the coordinates (the exact location) of a geocache nearby. Take along a small inexpensive item to swap when you find a cache. Learn more online and find a geocaching lesson or event on the geocaching calendar. Join the ongoing Texas State Parks Geocache Challenge and set out on your detective adventure, enjoying the natural world along the way!

 
Celebrate! Powderhorn Ranch to be Future Park PDF Print E-mail
Written by Texas Outdoors   
Sunday, 05 October 2014 14:20

Celebrate! Powderhorn Ranch to be Future Park

 

coastal Powderhorn RanchEverybody who loves the natural world, wildlife and state parks should be smiling for years to come about the very recent acquisition of the 17,351-acre Powderhorn Ranch along the Texas coast in Calhoun County. Watch a video about this pristine property that is one of the largest remaining tracts of unspoiled coastal prairie in the state and will someday be a state park and wildlife management area.

“This transformational project will conserve irreplaceable wildlife habitat and will bring the people of Texas an exciting new recreational opportunity,” said Dan Friedkin, Chairman Emeritus of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.

The property between Corpus Christi and Houston includes unspoiled coastal live oak forest and intact wetlands perfect for public hunting, fishing, hiking, paddling and birdwatching. Thousands of acres of freshwater wetlands and salt marshes offer vital fish and wildlife habitat, provide natural filtering to improve water quality, and shield people and property from storm surges and sea level rise.

Through a fundraising effort led by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation, the NFWF Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund has committed $34.5 million over the next three years, making this the biggest land acquisition in the nation so far using BP spill restoration dollars. The Conservation Fund and The Nature Conservancy also played critical roles in the acquisition.

 
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